Government of India National Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) Department of Health & Family Welfare
National Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) - Government of India

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Centre for Medical Entomology and Vector Management

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Full Mailing Address:

Centre for Medical Entomology and Vector Management,
National Centre for Disease Control,
22- Sham Nath Marg, Delhi – 110054.
Tele Fax. No. 01123987704

 

Head of the Division:

 
Dr. Tanzin Dikid, MBBS, MD
Joint Director & Head
Email ID- tanzin.dikid@gov.in

 

 

*Other Staff in the Division

 

 

Mr.Raishuddin
B.Sc. M.Sc
ARO

 


Dr. Sunita Patel
M.Sc. Ph D
ARO
Email ID- drsunitacdc@gmail.com

 


Ms. Shilpi Dhan
B.Sc. M.Sc
ARO
Email ID-
dhan_shilpi@yahoo.co

 

 

Mr. P. Chandrasekharan
M.Sc.
RA

 

 

Dr. Ved Prakash
M.Sc. Ph D
Technician
Email ID-
drvpmanncdc@gmail.com

 

 

Dr. Abhay Kumar Sharma
M.Phil Ph D
Technician
Email ID
- drabhayncdc@gmail.com

 

 

Mrs. Priya Singh
M.Sc. (Biotech.), PG-DMLT
Technician
Email ID-
priyancdc@gmail.com

 

 

 

Dr. Somya Sharma
M.Sc. Ph D
Technician
Email ID-
somya.entomology@gmail.com

 

 

 

Mrs. Shweta Sharma
M.Phil PhD (pursuing)
Technician
Email ID-
shweta.kaushik111@gmail.com

 

 

 
Mr. Anand Kumar
B.A.
Lab Attendent
Email ID-
ak.kumar750@gmail.com

 



Mr. Rambhool
7th
Head Animal Attendent

 

 

Name of the Branch under the supervision of the Centre: National Central for Disease Control,

Patna Branch, Bihar.

 

Broad activities:

 

  • Undertakes entomological investigation of outbreaks of vector-borne diseases and recommend appropriate vector control measures
  • Undertake assessment for potential of vector borne diseases and their control in areas affected due to natural calamities like earthquake, flood, tsunami and cyclone
  • Undertake Dengue, Zika and JE virus detection in mosquito vectors
  • Undertake laboratory and field evaluation of pesticides formulations against vectors and pests of public health importance
  • Undertake insecticide susceptibility tests in vectors and study cross resistance
  • Maintain a reference collection museum of preserved specimens of arthropods of medical importance to facilitate identification of the collected material
  • Maintain live cultures of arthropods of medical importance for teaching, supply and research purposes within and outside the institute
  • Capacity building through training courses on vector-borne diseases and their control
  • Maintain fish hatcheries of larvivorous fishes viz. Gambusia affinis and Poecilia reticulata for supply to various agencies in the country for the control of larval breeding and to initiate fish culture
  • Taxonomy, ecology and biology of vector arthropod species and dynamics of disease transmission
  • Identification and supply of live and preserved specimens of arthropods of medical importance to various health institutions in the country for teaching and research purposes.
  • Entomological surveillance for vector of plague, scrub typhus and other tick borne diseases in the country
  • Support to National Health Programmes:  
  1. NVBDCP: Monitoring and evaluation of VBD programme implementation in different states; monitoring and evaluation of indoor insecticidal spray under taken for the control of VBD in different states
  2. Support Integrated Disease Surveillance Programme (IDSP): Provide support in

entomological surveillance and control of VBD

 

Support Entomological Surveillance for International Health Regulations compliance at Points of Entry:

 

The centre is involved in the entomological surveillance at ten International Airports and seven Seaports in the pre and post-monsoon period. The findings are shared with the IH division of Directorate General of Health Services, Govt of India and the health offices at the points of entry for public health action.

As per International Health Regulations (IHR) 2005, all the International Airports/Seaports and peripherals areas up to 400 metres should be made free from vectors.

 

Capacity Building programmes/Trainings/Workshop/Seminars/ organized by the centre:

The centre is conducting capacity building programmes on Vector Borne Diseases and Public Health Entomology in collaboration with WHO for the health personals, which are having concern to control vector borne diseases. The courses will focus on vectors of local as well as national importance covering the following

aspects: -

  • Biology, ecology and application of modern tools in the management of vectors and vector borne diseases.
  • Entomological sampling methods and practices, vector surveillance procedures and methods.
  • Have in-depth knowledge of epidemiology, entomology and control measures for vector-borne diseases and its management.
  • Programme implementation and application of modern tools in the control and management of vectors of public health importance.

Training on "Vector Biology & Control of Vector Borne Disease" in collaboration with WHO, 2018.

                             

 

Training on "Ticks, Mites and Flea borne Disease", 2019

 

 

 

 Release of Training Module on "Ticks, Mites and Flea borne Disease", by Dr. N.S. Dhramsaktu (Principal Advisor, MoHFW, GoI) and Dr. Sujeet Singh (Director, NCDC), 2019

 

 Patent awarded:

 

  • Patent on “NICD mosquito proof” cooler in July2018
  • Patent awarded on “Biological Control”agent for mosquito larvae Chilodonella uncinate

Field Trials:

  • Phase III trial: Field evaluation of DuraNet LLIN at three eco-epidemiological locations-
  • Bastar District (CG) 2. Alwar District (Rajasthan) 3. East Godavari District (AP).

Units within the Centre:

S.No.

            Units

1.

Insecticide Testing Laboratory

2.

Virus Antigen Detection Laboratory

3.

Entomological Museum

4.

Insectary: Mosquito and Sandfly colonies

 

Units within the Centre:

Unit 1: Insecticide Testing Laboratory:

 

  • Laboratory and field evaluation of insecticide samples received from various National and International agencies against   vectors of public health importance.
  • Evaluation of newer formulations of insecticides
  • Monitoring of susceptibility status of vector species of arthropods of medical importance.

Evaluation of insecticide samples in the Insecticide Testing Laboratory.

 

 

Unit 2: Virus Antigen Detection Laboratory:

Detection of antigens from mosquitoes

  • JE virus antigen detection
  • Dengue virus antigen detection
  • Zika virus antigen detection

Processing of mosquito pools for Virus antigen detection in the VAD Laboratory.

 

 

 

Unit 3: National Reference Entomological Museum:

Maintaining an entomological museum with more than 1.5 lakh insect specimens. It contains many species of insects (Diptera, Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, Hymenoptera, Odonata, Hemiptera & Orthoptera) and few arachnids. It has 1,08,757 specimens (89,464 Mosquitoes belonging to 31 genera and 539 species). Besides these, there are 19,293 entomological Specimens, other than mosquitoes. The oldest specimen, Simulium indicum is from United Kingdom collected in 1902, and the oldest collection from India is of malaria vector Anopheles culcifacies collected, in 1905 from Karnal, Haryana State. Collections also include An. sundaicus (Car Nicobar, India in 2005), An. stephensi, An. subpictus, Culex quinquefasciatus, Ae. aegypti (Alwar & Jaipur, India in 2017), Ae. aegypti (Ahmedabad, India in 2017).

 

National Reference Entomological Museum with more than 1.5 lakh insect specimens

 

Unit 4: Insectary:

Mosquito and Sandfly colonies

The centre is having well maintained facilty for the arthropods of medical importance and mosquito larvivorous fishes for different research activities.

The insectary facility is maintaining both adults and larval stages of the anopheline and Culicine mosquitoes and Phlebotomus sps. which can be used for different bioassays, adulticide tests, repellent tests, susceptibility assessment towards insecticides, etc.

  • Mosquito colonies: Anopheles stephensi, Culex quinquefasciatusand Aedes aegypti.
  • Sandfly colony: Phlebotomus argentipes.
  • Laboratory Culture of Gambusia affinis: Mosquito larvivorous fish, Gambusia affinis is established in the CME & VM for demonstration purpose for training students.

 

Supply of different arthropods of medical importance such as Anopheles, Aedes, Culex, etcslides of them and their different parts such as wings, legs, mouth parts, antenna, and slides of different vector species of Arthropods (sandfly, Ticks, mites, fleas etc.) to the institutions.

 

Larval trays of Anopheles stephensi, Culex quinquefasciatusand Aedes aegypti in mosquito colony

 

 

 

  Processing of larvae, eggs and adults of sandfly, Phlebotomus argentipes.               

  

“NICD Cooler”

Dengue and Chikungunya have become important outbreak prone vector borne diseases in the country. The mosquitoes transmitting these viral diseases are found breeding in domestic/peri-domestic containers including desert coolers.

The conventional desert coolers are being used in many parts of the country as a cooling device in houses, offices and industrial establishments during the summer months. The conventional desert coolers hold water for long period and they have become the potential breeding grounds for dangerous mosquitoes in absence of adequate control efforts.

The study carried out in Delhi area revealed that more than 50% of the breeding places of dengue vectors are contributed by these conventional coolers because of the following reasons: 

  1. The water tank of the conventional coolers is open type, which attracts mosquitoes for egg laying which results in prolific breeding of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and transmit Dengue/Chikungunya viruses.
  2. Weekly larviciding or cleaning is required to prevent breeding of mosquitoes inside the cooler, which is often not practiced.
  3. Standing water in the cooler, when not in use, particularly during monsoon season, has high potential for the breeding of dengue vector mosquito and thus increases the risk of disease transmission.

In order to overcome the above problems, a mosquito proof desert cooler (NICD Cooler) has been designed in 2009.The NICD cooler has the following advantages over the conventional desert coolers:

  1. Water tank of the NICD cooler is completely covered to prevent the entry of mosquitoes in to the water tank for egg laying. There is thus no risk of disease transmission due to coolers.
  2. No weekly cleaning of the water tank is required.
  3. No chemical larvicide is required to kill mosquito larvae.
  4. It can be conveniently installed in high rise buildings.
  5. Even standing water in the cooler, when not in use, has no risk of mosquito breeding.

 

The NICD cooler is a patented item and registered with National Research Development Corporation (A DSIR enterprise, Ministry of Science and Technology) and is being manufactured and marketed by the 13 agencies.

 

Mosquito proof desert cooler (NICD Cooler) designed in 2009

 

 

List of Scientific publications (2017-2021):

  1. Sunita Patel, AK Sharma Shilpi Dhan, Priya Singh, et.al. 2020Dengue Vector Surveillance in and around Mormugao Port Trust (MPT) – Goa, India. Journal of Communicable Diseases. 2017. 49 (3): 4-8.
  2. Sharma AK, KumarK, Thomas TG and Singh SK. 2018. Ecto-parasites of rodents collected from International seaport, Gujarat (India) with special reference to Plague and Scrub Typhus transmission. Journal of Communicable Diseases,50(4): 7-13.
  3. Shweta Kaushik, Neeta Raj Sharma, TG Thomas, Abhay Kumar Sharma, Anu Bansal. Indigenous Plants and their Larvicidal Potential against Indian Mosquito Vectors: A Review. Journal of Communicable Diseases. 2019, vol. 51, Issue 2, Pg. No. 59-72.
  4. Anu Bansal, Neeta Raj Sharma, Atul K Upadhyay, Shweta Kaushik, TG Thomas. Evaluation of Carvacrol and its Receptor (Ubiquinone-c-reductase) as a Potential Anti-malarial Drug. Journal of Communicable Diseases. 2019, vol. 51, Issue 4 - 2019, Pg. No. 16-20.
  5. Sujeet K.Singh, S.K.Jain, S.N.Sharma and Sukhvir Singh. 2019. 70 Years of Indian Society for Malaria and Other Communicable Diseases towards public health in the country. Journal of Communicable Diseases,51 (1):29-33.
  6. RinaKumawat, T.G. Thomas, Sujeet Kumar Singh et al. 2019. Entomological Survey during Zika Virus Infection in Ahmedabad, Gujarat. Journal of Communicable Diseases, 51(1):12-17.
  7. SN Sharma, RinaKumawat, Sujeet Kumar Singh. 2019. Kyasanur Forest Disease: Vector Surveillance and its Control. Journal of Communicable Diseases, 51(3): 55-61.
  8. SN Sharma, Ram Singh, RinaKumawat, Sujeet Kumar Singh. 2019. Scrub Typhus: Vector Surveillance and its Control. Journal of Communicable Diseases, 51(3): 55-61.
  9. SN Sharma, Ram Singh, RinaKumawat, Sujeet Kumar Singh. 2019. Rodents as Public Health pests: Identification, Surveillance & its Management. Journal of Communicable Diseases, 51(3): 55-61.
  10. Sweta Bhan, Pankaj U Ramteke, Amarpal Singh, RinaKumawat and Abhay K Sharma. 2019. Entomological surveillance of Dengue vectors in Bareilly District of Uttar Pradesh, India. (Abstract No.-PP:15). Proceedings of the XIII Annual Conference of Indian Society for Malaria and other Communicable Diseases (29th November 2019 to 1st December 2019).
  11. Shweta Kaushik, Neeta Raj Sharma, T.G. Thomas, Abhay Kumar and AnuBansal. 2019. Indigenousplants and their Larvicidal potential against Indian Mosquito Vectors: A Review.Journal of Communicable Diseases, 51(2): 59-72.
  12. Anu Bansal,Neeta Raj Sharma, Atul K Upadhyay, Shweta Kaushik andT.G. Thomas. 2019. Evaluation of Carvacrol and its receptor (Ubiquinone-c-reductase) as a potential Anti-Malarial Drug.Journal of Communicable Diseases, 51(4): 16-20.
  13. N.Sharma and Sujeet Kumar Singh. 2020. Challenges and Threats due to deadly Corona virus in India and dealing with social vaccine (distancing) – the only vaccine.Journal of Communicable Diseases, 52(1): 7-13.
  14. Sujeet K.Singh, S.K.Jain and S.N.Sharma. 2020. Prevention and Control of Covid-19 in Indian Perspective. Int., 5(1): 32-38.
  15. N.Sharma, Ram Singh, RinaKumawat and Sujeet Kumar Singh. 2020. Guidelines for Vector Surveillance and its Control at International airports and ports in India. Journal of Communicable Diseases, 52(1): 38-60.
  16. Sujeet K.Singh, S.K.Jain and S.N.Sharma. 2020. Situational Analysis and Trend of Covid-19 in India. Journal of Communicable Diseases, 52(2): 38-45.
  17. AMKM Rao, ND Kanchana, SN Sharma. 2020. Sampling Model on Surveillance of COVID-19 virus among Human Populations. Journal of Communicable Diseases,52(2): 12-1
  18. Kamal, Ramesh Chandra, KK Mitra and SN Sharma. 2020. An investigation into Outbreak of Malaria in Bareilly district of Uttar Pradesh, India. Journal of Communicable Diseases, 52(2): 1-11.
  19. Rajendran R, Sheela Devi D, Anusree SB, Regu K, SNSharma. 2020. Coronaviruses: The Most Dangerous Pathogen of Present Era. Journal of Communicable Diseases, 52(4): 17-28.
  20. N. Sharma, Ram Singh, RinaKumawat and Sujeet Kumar Singh. 2020. Vectors of CCHF: Prevention and its control. Journal of Communicable Diseases,53(1): 22-26.
  21. Vector Surveillance for Dengue, Chikungunya, Zika Virus and Yellow Fever at Three Blocks of Pakud Districts of Jharkhand, India. Ved Prakash; Sunita Patel; Sweta Bhan; TG Thomas J. Commun Dis, 2020;52 (4): 1-4
  22. Amarpal Singh Bhadauriya, Pankaj U Ramteke, Abhay K Sharma, R.K Meena, RinaKumawat, Sweta Bhan, Lalthazuali, Ram Singh and ArunChouhan. 2020. Entomological Investigations of an outbreak of Japanese Encephalitis in three districts of Chhattisgarh, India in the year 2017. International Journal of Advanced Research, 8(2): 161-171.
  23. Amarpal Singh Bhadauriya, Shilpi Dhan, Pankaj U Ramteke, Sweta Bhan, Lalthazuali, RinaKumawat, Ram Singh, ArunChauhan. 2020. Entomological Survey for Aedes Species at Deendayal Seaport, Kandla, Gujarat India during Pre-Monsoon Period, 2018. Journal of Communicable Diseases,52(4): 35-38.
  24. Sweta Bhan, Lalthazuali, Abhay K Sharma, T.G. Thomas and Ram Singh. 2020. Entomological assessment of malaria outbreak in Bareilly and Budaun districts of Uttar Pradesh, India. International Journal of Mosquito Research, 7(5): 53-59.
  25. Lalthazuali, Sweta Bhan, T. G. Thomas and Ram Singh. 2020. Post flood vector borne disease surveillance: An experience from Malappuram district of Kerala, India in 2018. International Journal of Mosquito Research, 7(5): 01-06.
  26. Lalthazuali, Abhay Kumar Sharma, TG Thomas, Sweta Bhan, Amarpal Singh Bhadauriya, Pankaj U Ramteke, RinaKumawat, Ram Singh al. 2020. Entomological Survey of Vectors of Scrub Typhus in Haulawng, Lunglei district,Mizoram, India. Journal of Communicable Diseases, 52(2): 69-73
  27. Lalthazuali andAbhay Kumar Sharma. 2020. Entomological Survey for Vectors during Scrub Typhus outbreak in Haulawng, Lunglei district,Mizoram, India.(Abstract No.-PP:16). Proceedings of the XIII Annual Conference of Indian Society for Malaria and other Communicable Diseases (29th November 2019 to 1st December 2019).
  28. Sunita Patel, Ram Singh, Sujeet Kumar Singh et.al. 2020. A study on the influence of climatic factors on the prefential breeding places of Aedes, the Dengue vector, in Delhi, India. International Journal of Mosquito Research, 7(4): 95-104.
  29. VedParkash, Sunita Patel, Sweta Bhan, TG Thomas. 2020. Vector Surveillance for Dengue, Chikungunya, Zika Virus and Yellow Fever at Three Blocks of Pakur Districts of Jharkhand, India. Journal of Communicable Diseases, 52(4): 77-80.
  30. N.Sharma, B.R. Mane, Mahendra Sonar, SanketKulkarni , Raishuddin, RinaKumawat, Ram Singh ,S.K.Singh. 2021. Entomological Survey for CCHF Vectors in Palghar District of Maharashtra. Journal of Communicable Diseases, 53(1): being published in March Issue.
  31. Kaushal K, Dhuria M, Mariam W, Jain S K, Singh S, Garg S, Chauhan A. Experience of setting up of Control room for COVID-19 at NCDC, New Delhi. Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care, Vol 10, No. 3, March 2021, pp. 1082-1085.
  32. Sharma SN, Kamalakannan S, Sharma AK and Chandrasekaran P. NCDC assists Uttarakhand Government in preparedness against Vector Borne Diseases (VBDs) at Kumbh Mela, Haridwar, April 2021. NCDC Newsletter. 2021; 10(2): 10-11.

 

 Dr. Sunil Kumar  DGHS, Director NCDC and Director NVBDCP visited  CME&VM division

 

Visit of DGHS, Director NCDC and Director NVBDCP to the National Referral Museum, CME&VM division, NCDC